Blog Archives

Ch-Ch-Ch-Changes!

Today, I would like to talk about changes. This semester has brought a lot of changes in my life, and I have had mixed feelings about them. The way I figure it, the best way to cope with something is to talk about it, so that is what I’m going to do. Read the rest of this entry

Research Step Two: Topic Selection

Ok friends, let us recap here. In my last post I discussed the first step to the research process, which is finding your purpose. Now, with a fuel behind our fire we are ready to move on to the second step! The second step of research is, of course, picking your topic. To be honest, I don’t have any mystical guru magic to help you pick your topic, but I will inform you of my own personal process.

I picked my topic about a year ago, and that is really hard to believe. Looking back, from start to finish, my project has taken me a year to complete. So here I was a year ago, with a senior thesis and a grant application awaiting me, and I had to pick what I was going to do. The first thing I did was come up with a few ideas which I was interested in researching. I think that the best way to think of ideas is to find a question that you would like to have an answer for. That is what research really is: having a question and putting in the time and effort to get an answer.

imagesWhen coming up with my ideas I knew I wanted to study something associated with the elderly (gerontology minor, duh!), so I came up with a list of ideas that looked something like this:

  • Study whether giving residents in nursing homes a pet/plant would lower depression.
  • Do a meta-analysis on the percentage of people that pass away within a few months of entering a nursing home.
  • Study whether playing music to residents in a nursing home would lower their depression.

So as you can see, a common theme was lowering depression, and I had also thrown in the meta-analysis because I thought that looking at the percentages would be interesting. A meta-analysis is when a research compares and contrasts results from several different studies and look for patterns within those studies.

I took my list of ideas to my advisor, and she helped me to narrow down my project. We talked about each idea in length, and eventually picked the most doable/interesting. We ruled out the meta-analysis almost immediately because, though I could have done it, it was the least fun and interactive. Next, we ruled out the pet/plant idea because there would be too many other factors to consider (such as the residents state of living, dementia, etc.) and we decided the study would not yield accurate results. That left us with my music-listening project!

As you can see, picking my topic was a process of thinking about what I was interested in, and then consulting my advisor on what was practical. No matter what you are studying, the process for topic selection should be very similar. Next week I will discuss general obstacles in the beginning of a project, including the dreaded IRB application process. Feel free to comment below on how you chose your research topic!

 

Baby Come Back! You Can Blame It All On Me…

I’m sitting at my computer, thinking about how to communicate how I am feeling. It’s difficult because the past few months have been one of those times in life where you look back, and you’re not really sure how time could move so fast and how you could have moved so slowly. First, to all of my readers, I want to give you a heartfelt apology. My life got crazy, and I neglected writing because in my mind I was only disappointing myself. After sitting down and looking at a piece of paper with stats that showed me that people truly do care about my life and my words, I am newly committed to writing consistently and honestly. I never truly thought before now that what I sent out into the world was being read by anyone other than my dad, but knowing that there are people that enjoy reading my posts gives me the inspiration that I had lost.

So let us talk about what life has brought me this past summer! I stopped posting somewhere near the middle of April, and as you can imagine, the end of year brought the struggle of finals. Then, I moved to Knoxville at the beginning of the summer and moved in with my new, shiny fiancé! He proposed on Easter Sunday, April 20th, and I can tell you at the moment of my writing this there are 477 days, 10 hours, 18 minutes, and 39 seconds until I say “I do”  to my best friend. By the time we moved in together, I had already missed a couple of posts and it was easy to let the obligation slip my mind. Jared and I spent the next month figuring out what it meant to pay bills, eat off 75$ for two weeks, and spend quality time together. We felt the struggle of losing major income, Jared struggling to find a job, sorting out who got what chores, and much more. We also got to enjoy movie nights, cooking our favorite meals together, hanging out with friends and family, and living life side by side. There were definitely fights and struggles. There was also laughter and love. This summer was probably the best thing that could’ve happened in our relationship, because now we know what the real world feels like and that we can get through it together.

Yay!

Meanwhile, I embarked on an adventure! This summer I had three jobs, and they all had special challenges to go along with them. I discussed them in my post “She Works Hard for the Money,” but actually doing them was a unique experience. Monday through Friday, I worked 8am-12pm at my internship at the Parkwest Senior Behavioral Unit, and 1pm-6pm at the local daycare. I absolutely loved my time at Parkwest. The unit, which consisted of 16 acute-care beds, treated seniors with a variety of psychiatric and behavioral problems. There I learned how to do one-on-one therapy, communicate with families, and what it means to work in a hospital setting. This internship has also inspired me to pursue a career in social work! I am hoping to be admitted to the UT Masters of Science in Social Work program, and I will be applying for that later this semester. At the daycare I learned to work in the new after school room, which consisted of 5-11 year olds. Let me tell you: angry eight year-olds is a whole different ballgame than preschoolers, and I definitely developed as a daycare teacher this summer. This year, when I left, I felt like I had truly done good work.  By the time I got home every day, I had worked ten hours and was absolutely exhausted. Jared typically took pity on me and cooked dinner, and for that please give him a round of applause.

My third job was my summer research. Every Sunday I went to a local assisted living facility and conducted research that focused on music listening. Special challenges that came with this project included jumping through all of the legal hoops involved with working with the elderly, accommodating hearing disabilities, encouraging subjects to participate, and much, much more. As of last week, I am officially done with data collection! My next step is to analyze my data and begin constructing my poster presentation for the Appalachian College Association Summit in October. I am super nervous and excited to present my work for the Summit, but I have so much to do beforehand! Look out for an upcoming series by me highlighting the research process from start to finish. From applying for a grant, to getting IRB approval, to data collection and analysis, and even presentation; I am excited to share with my readers both my project and what a general research project entails.

So this summer had been the best and most challenging part of my life thus far. I don’t consider it an excuse for not writing, but at the end of the day my priorities were so focused on my work, my family and my relationship that it felt like there was room for nothing else. Here is to a new start! Feel free to comment below on what you did this summer!