Research Step Two: Topic Selection

Ok friends, let us recap here. In my last post I discussed the first step to the research process, which is finding your purpose. Now, with a fuel behind our fire we are ready to move on to the second step! The second step of research is, of course, picking your topic. To be honest, I don’t have any mystical guru magic to help you pick your topic, but I will inform you of my own personal process.

I picked my topic about a year ago, and that is really hard to believe. Looking back, from start to finish, my project has taken me a year to complete. So here I was a year ago, with a senior thesis and a grant application awaiting me, and I had to pick what I was going to do. The first thing I did was come up with a few ideas which I was interested in researching. I think that the best way to think of ideas is to find a question that you would like to have an answer for. That is what research really is: having a question and putting in the time and effort to get an answer.

imagesWhen coming up with my ideas I knew I wanted to study something associated with the elderly (gerontology minor, duh!), so I came up with a list of ideas that looked something like this:

  • Study whether giving residents in nursing homes a pet/plant would lower depression.
  • Do a meta-analysis on the percentage of people that pass away within a few months of entering a nursing home.
  • Study whether playing music to residents in a nursing home would lower their depression.

So as you can see, a common theme was lowering depression, and I had also thrown in the meta-analysis because I thought that looking at the percentages would be interesting. A meta-analysis is when a research compares and contrasts results from several different studies and look for patterns within those studies.

I took my list of ideas to my advisor, and she helped me to narrow down my project. We talked about each idea in length, and eventually picked the most doable/interesting. We ruled out the meta-analysis almost immediately because, though I could have done it, it was the least fun and interactive. Next, we ruled out the pet/plant idea because there would be too many other factors to consider (such as the residents state of living, dementia, etc.) and we decided the study would not yield accurate results. That left us with my music-listening project!

As you can see, picking my topic was a process of thinking about what I was interested in, and then consulting my advisor on what was practical. No matter what you are studying, the process for topic selection should be very similar. Next week I will discuss general obstacles in the beginning of a project, including the dreaded IRB application process. Feel free to comment below on how you chose your research topic!

 

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Posted on September 16, 2014, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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